March 26, 2017

Speaking

My Literary Coach offers the following speaking topics to public groups or gatherings:

  • Navigating the Upside-Down World of Publishing: Not long ago, a large number of authors could live from their writing by getting an advance by which to write their book and then royalties as it sold. Book publishing now is one of the more risk-averse, financially conservative, but culturally liberal businesses. Today, authors need to ensure that their last book sells in order to get a publishing agreement for the next one. This talk focuses on the rarely discussed, odd behaviors that undo most authors seeking to become published. Want to Learn More? To get more information, send an email to info@myliterarycoach.com or contact us.
  • Building Your Author (or Writer) Platform: Platform is what you create before your book is published and consists of those things you can leverage–increasingly by little effort on your part–into instant sales and buzz. It’s the reason that celebrities will get book deals, when the book ties into their fans’ interests or the reason that having a well-known co-author (or series, such as … for Dummies) can help. You can’t do it all and you’ll never be finished. So, what do you need to do now? Want to Learn More? To get more information, send an email to info@myliterarycoach.com or contact us.
  • Capturing a Literary Agent for Your Fiction or Nonfiction: Now an old saying, “It’s harder to get a literary agent than a publisher,” and the saying is true. Many publishers today use agents to screen submissions. Agents take their fees from authors’ earnings–not publishers’ revenues–so agents provide a really inexpensive screen. How do you write a proposal that will attract agents and how do you target the right agents? Want to Learn More? To get more information, send an email to info@myliterarycoach.com or contact us.
  • Deciding to Self-Publish (or to Form a Limited Partnership): The dominant publishing model has been that the publisher license the author’s rights to publish and sell finished books; that published chose the title, created the cover, and priced the book. Recently, Simon & Schuster purchased Author Solutions and Random House set up three digital-book-first imprints. With the advent of inexpensive Print On Demand (POD), especially provided by Amazon’s Create Space and Ingram Book Wholesaler’s Lightning Source, authors can get their books published with a professional look and now with increased circulation. Meanwhile, some POD companies have altered their business model to promote partnerships between freelancers and authors so that each partner gets an equity stake in the sales–and therefore is more active in promotion. What to do? That’s the focus of this talk. Want to Learn More? To get more information, send an email to info@myliterarycoach.com or contact us.
  • Writing a Book Proposal: Fiction or Nonfiction: An author finishes their manuscript, and looks for someone to read it and offer suggestions (or rush it to print). The publishing industry, however, doesn’t read manuscripts. Instead it reads proposals which are business plans for each book as a new product launch. This talk focuses on how to write a book proposal for fiction or nonfiction (the proposals are quite different) and how to target the most likely agents.Want to Learn More? To get more information, send an email to info@myliterarycoach.com or contact us.